Mar. 6, 2019

Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney: The White Stain Of Absolute Black Oppression

March 6, 1857
The White Stain Of Black Oppression
Supreme Justice Off The Rails
Dred Scott vs. John A. Sanford
#joesmokeblackthoughts
 
One hundred and sixty-two years ago, March 6, 1857, the United States Supreme Court handed down the most pitiable, contemptible, and wretched ruling in its supposed history of safeguarding justice and democracy. The Supreme Court ruled by a vote of seven justices affirming and two justices descending the following "a negro, whose ancestors were imported into [the U.S.], and sold as slaves, whether enslaved or free, could not be an American citizen and therefore did not have a standing to sue in federal court. Chief Justice Roger Taney further stained this nation that was supposedly birth on these founding principles:
 
"We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness."
 
With the phrase that follows Roger Taney embodied the entire nature and scope of white America's quest for the aggregate sum of white supremacy. The effects of this nefarious decision are still evident in today's society. Here's what Chief Justice Roger Taney wrote:
 
 
The Dred Scott decision was moved supposedly rendered meaningless once the Civil War ended the institution of slavery in 1865. However, history has proven otherwise since these duplicitous words many white Americans felt and still feel superior to Americans of African Descent. I not going to retrace the Dred Scott's personal journey towards absolute injustice in today's post. All today's post is aimed at is questioning why do the remnants of this insane judgment still generate an atmosphere of racism today. Is it the line that states, they (Americans of African Descent) had no rights which the white man was bound to respect? I do know that the decision by the Taney court lived far beyond the eights that followed the ruling and the end of the Civil War.
 
In 1883 The United States Supreme Court ruled that the Civil Rights Bill of 1875, or Enforcement Bill was unconstitutional stating that the United States Congress could regulate states but not individuals. This ruling set the stage for the decadent period of black oppression that could conceivably be considered far more malignant and vicious than slavery. The re-enslavement of southern Americans of African Descent. You can move on to the racially historic Plessey vs Ferguson decision that ruled that separate but unequal was absolutely constitutional. The fact that The United States Supreme Court virtually ignored any and all cases of black injustice for more than a century after the Dred Scott ruling of 1857. To me, that is more indicative that the motivation behind the written words of Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney and his six racist followers continue to be re-energized long after the Dred Scott decision was supposedly made moot by the Union victory over the Confederacy in 1865.
 
Even after the judicial victory Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas ruled separate but inherently unequal was unconstitutional. Didn't President Eisenhower state the following:
 
 
The essence of that statement is the underlying effects that the words written by Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney continue to taint and stain this so-called American democracy. It is even evident in today's society when you have in the United States Congress Representative Steve King willing to be quoted saying:
 
 
Yes, the psychology power the judicial ruling of 1857 still resonates today. That is why for almost 4 centuries plus white people of a certain white supremacist racist persuasion will never feel that people of color are in any way equal to them. That is why it is imperative that some comprehensive model of reparations is developed to bring about some measure of leveled equality to Americans of African Descent in the United States. The words written by Supreme Court Justice Roger B. Tany in 1857 continue to stain this country's history. It is time for the application of a powerful cleansing agent to wipe the board clean. The fact of the matter is The United States of America has ignored the virus far too long. Let's use our collective forces to actually force a solution otherwise racism and Roger Taney's words will continue to endure.