Speaking & Teaching

Feb. 22, 2020

Whether Ella Baker was working for labor interests, NAACP concerns, SCLC issues, or expanding the minds of the young brothers and sisters at SNCC. Ella Baker was supernatural in so many ways. Born and died on December 13, those 83 years in between were by anyone's standard full of defiance and power.

Ella Baker had a supernatural sense of belief in the power of group dynamics over individual leadership. That’s why Ella Baker spent her life working so hard to develop strong organizations that were capable of building black unification and black political, civil, and social progress. From the Tidewater area where she was born to the hamlets and molehills of the Mississippi Black Delta to the urban cities the name Ella Baker should resonate with everyone today. Ella Baker never had a child but Ella Baker birthed many a movement with her determination and strength of will and wisdom. Who do I respect more than Ella Baker? No one because Ella Baker never allowed her sense of individuality overlap the sense of group accomplishment. Ella Baker was indeed supernatural.

Feb. 22, 2020



A MOMENT IN BLACK HISTORY
ROBERT SMALLS WAS SUPER HUMAN AND HE WAS REAL

Why not read a real story or learn some actual real deal history about an actual black hero in the flesh. Robert Smalls risked everything for his family, he put his life on the line facing a confederate navy just to secure their and his freedom. Robert Small determined that he would rather die than live a life chained to slavery.

Robert Smalls rose from slavery to be one of very few black men to serve in Congress during Reconstruction, Robert Smalls who commandeered The Planter a confederate ship he worked on as a slave. He piloted that ship through treacherous confederate waters and delivered it to Union Navy outside of the city of Charleston, South Carolina.

Robert Smalls also purchased the home of his former master in Charleston, South Carolina. Robert Smalls served in Congress and never stopped working for the rights of absolute citizenship for blacks in this nation. So I only ask that you read some of your magnificent black history rather than having your eyes glued to TMZ, or watching media driven trash about the fake lives of created black folks. You see truth is hidden while fantasy is available.

Our ancestors were powerful but many of their accomplishments and heroic deeds are covered up. The media and entertainment is driven to divert you subconsciously from thinking you are capable of doing incredible feats like Robert Smalls performed. However, you see there is a little Robert Smalls in every black person in this nation. You simply need to awaken from your slumber and rise up in power.

Feb. 21, 2020

Salute To A Messenger of Hope, Justice, and Peace
"MORE THAN JUST A SINGLE LETTER
MESSENGER DIRECTLY FROM MOST HIGH"

OSSIE DAVIS DURING HIS EULOGY OF MALCOLM X IDENTIFIED HIM AS THE PRINCE OF HARLEM. I SAY MALCOLM X WAS THE CROWNED PRINCE OF ULTIMATE BLACKNESS IN BLACK AMERICA.

TODAY'S DEDICATION ON MY BLOG IS A SPECIAL TRIBUTE "IN HIS WORDS, MY VOICE", MALCOLM X (el-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz) ON THE 55th ANNIVERSARY OF HIS ASSASSINATION AT THE AUDUBON BALLROOM.

JANUARY 1, 1965, ABOUT 7 WEEKS BEFORE HE TOOK HIS LAST BREATH BROTHER MALCOLM X WAS IN THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. MALCOLM WAS MEETING WITH THE MEMBERS OF THE MISSISSIPPI FREEDOM DEMOCRATIC PARTY DISCUSSING THE NEXT STEPS ON SECURING JUSTICE AND EQUALITY IN A STATE SEARING WITH HATRED AND SEGREGATION.

THE SPEECH THAT I AM I READING THIS MORNING IS ONE OF THE FINAL SPEECHES IN THE LIFE OF MALCOLM X. OUR BLACK HISTORY NEED NOT EVER BE A BLACK MYSTERY.

GOD BLESS YOU ETERNALLY BROTHER MALCOLM (el-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz)

Feb. 20, 2020

A Majestic Moment In Black History
The Blackman Who Reads & Creates

I Want To Be Free
Saluting The Underground Railroad
Break These Shackles
Free Me From These Contemptuous White
Jackals

Feb. 20, 2020

In our history in this country there have been many individuals who rose above their circumstances to make a mark in this country’s progression to true and unbinding democracy. As we celebrate this month what should be celebrated everyday black historical accomplishments. The Blackman Read Aloud Hour Project remembers Joseph Hayne Rainey, born in Georgetown, South Carolina to enslaved parents in 1832, becoming on December 12, 1870, the first African American to serve in the United States House of Representatives and only the second person to serve Congress after U.S. Senator Hiram Revels of Mississippi. He was elected to Congress four times as a Republican, serving until March 3, 1879, which made him the longest-serving black Congressman during the Reconstruction era. In a speech given on the floor of Congress in 1871, Rainey challenges a New York Democratic representative who made disparaging remarks about the black members of the South Carolina state legislature. You must understand that Joseph Rainey did all this while residing in one of the most racist states in the nation. The state that produced John Calhoun and Ben Tillman, two men who had absolutely no love or respect for people of color.