Speaking & Teaching

Apr. 9, 2020

“Keep alive the dream; for as long as a man has a dream in his heart, he cannot lose the significance of living.”
Howard Thurman

“Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”
Howard Thurman

“A man is a man, no more, no less. The awareness of this fact marks the supreme moment of human dignity.”
Howard Thurman

Dr. Howard Thurman was born on November 18, 1900, he passed away on April 10, 1981.

Howard Thurman was the embodiment​ of spiritual greatness. Today I read from a document I secured online from the​ Morehouse​ College archives, Howard Thurman and Martin Luther King, At The Intersection Where Worlds Collide. Dr. Thurman had a profound effect on Martin Luther King Jr. especially following his near-death experience in Harlem in 1958. Join The Black Blogger as I share this powerful reading which I believe was a forward of the book Where Worlds Collide. It seems that men like Howard Thurman now are few and far between but in order for our communities to fully prosper we need the words of Dr. Thurman to continue to educate today’s and tomorrow’s black leaders. Just as Dr. Thurman challenged Martin Luther King to stretch his philosophy towards justice for all. He can provide that same directive thought to others.


There is always that one person who changes the course of history and never receives the credit for that accomplishment. Rev. Howard Thurman is that man to me because had not Howard Thurman been so instrumental in the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who knows if Dr. King path been completely different. Of course, it's quite possible that Dr. King would've seen the ultimate messenger of civil nonviolence that he became in this nation's history. But I am sure that when Martin Luther King Jr. was at the crossroads of deciding his eventual spiritual path having a voice like Howard Thurman in his ears had to be a positive voice. As we look back on April 10, 1981, when Dr. Reverend Howard Thurman passed away. I salute this magnificent spiritual giant. For as sure as you should canonize Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. , you should remember and honor one of his most powerful mentors Howard Thurman.

Apr. 9, 2020

Paul Robeson was a man without peers. This nation should have revered and placed Paul Robeson on a pedestal of legendary status. Yet, Paul Robeson made one mistake that this nation couldn't ignore. Paul Robeson was born to be a proud and defiant black man. For that reason Paul Robeson’s legendary feats and human rights victories we're erased from America’s history books. Black communities across this nation should celebrate Paul Robeson but today on his 122nd birthday, Paul Robeson is virtually ignored. Today let me read words from a speech Paul Robeson gave in 1949 a time when Paul Robeson could’ve been living comfortably. Paul Robeson was challenging America's systems of inequality and human injustice.

Apr. 8, 2020

The Eulogy of Dr. Martin Luther King
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had two eulogies on April, 9, 1968. The first was given by his closest friend Ralph David Abernathy at Dr. King’s church Ebenezer Baptist Church, in Atlanta, Georgia. This eulogy between best friends wàs poignant and quite emotional. The second historic eulogy was given on the campus of Martin Luther King Jr.’s undergraduate college Morehouse College by Morehouse President Dr. Benjamin Mays. This is the reading I am doing today. On the 52th anniversary of the burial date of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Five days after his murder in Memphis, TN the nation was still torn apart with strife. Dr. Mays stepped forward and attempted to heal some of the open wounds that were inflicted on black and white communities by Dr. King’s murder. Dr. Mays and Dr. King had made a pact that either one of them would preach the eulogy of the other when either passed. Of course, Dr. Mays being much older than Dr. King always assumed that his former student would preach his eulogy not vice-versa. Yet, on that early Spring day in Atlanta, Dr. Benjamin Mays gave one of his most powerful speeches regarding his friend and former student, Martin Luther King, Jr. I hope you have the chance to listen to each word of the eulogy. It moved the crowd in attendance as well as the nation to understand that in order for Dr King's murder not to be in vain. The nation, this nation, had to change from a path of hate and bigotry to a path of love and equality.

Apr. 8, 2020

Where’s Joe? In Hiding Of Course. He’s In The Target Age Group Of COVID 19. Tell Me Again Why Is He The Democratic Party Nominee?

Apr. 7, 2020

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee was founded on the campus of the historic Shaw University, 60 years ago. SNCC as it came to be known was the rallying call to action for the younger set of black and white students committed to seeing social and civil change in this nation. Although the organization only survived 6 years. Those years saw a contingent of black leaders who truly inspired change in our communities across the nation. Think about you may think that Black Power started in Oakland, California with the formation of the Black Panthers. But in reality you must go the SNCC’s involvement with Lowndes County, Alabama’s move to register black voter, or to that field in Greenwood, Mississippi when SCNN Coordinator Stokely Carmichael voiced Black Power during the James Meredith March Against Fear in 1966. SNCC was like a streaking star whose blaze of light was short lived but oh so powerful. Ella Baker put together the concept of SNCC and she also encouraged them to be separate and apart from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference which was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. organization. In this speech she gave during the inception of SNCC, Ella Baker discussed that the organization and the movement of these young people was so much bigger than a hamburger. Had it not been for SNCC’s determination and desire for fundamental change in this nation, we would be in a terrible situation presently. That’s why we should never forget the commitment to purpose of these giants of social and civil change.