Speaking & Teaching

Jan. 15, 2020

Just finished watching the Netflix project on Aaron Hernandez. I mean this athletically talented young man who became an absolute danger to not only others in society but also himself in the end. So, what did the project want to prove? Playing football and being entitled because of that gift caused Aaron Hernandez to sway off course, or being undercover gay and forced displays of masculinity caused Aaron Hernandez to leave murdered bodies and loss souls in his wake? I do know one thing this American society we live in today has absolutely allowed a kid’s game to become so all important that people are willing to accept all sorts of deviant behavior from the game’s participants just to have a winning team in their city. What has become of our values when win at any and all costs is now the measure of success in life. We glorify winning and because of that we see the crumbling of country’s values. It used to be it doesn’t matter whether you win or lose. It’s how you play the game that counts. Now you are a joker if you take that line because “winning at all costs “ forgives all the sinning you did to get to the gloried circle of winning.

Jan. 14, 2020

So many in our black communities are intellectually, morally, spiritually, and mentally bankrupt. It is difficult phase we are in right now. The phase of discontentment with direct action or even a semblance of action against those who oppress. If Dr. King were still alive he would say that our black communities have chosen chaos over unity. Dr. King would ask that every community identity a multitude of individuals with the drum major instinct. Dr. King would ask our black communities to choose realistic group progress over individual material growth. Dr. King would ask that each of our elected representatives whether on a municipal, state, or federal level take an oath of dedication towards community growth.
So until those things are fixed in our black communities we're hopeless as a community. We will continue to see singular success but any real lasting success of our communities is a far off dream that King envisioned on the mountain top on April 3, 1968.

Jan. 11, 2020

Malcolm X was assassinated in 1965 at the Autobahn Coliseum in Harlem, NYC. He was eulogized by Ossie Davis as our unique black prince. He spoke directly to our communities about the concerns and issues that faced our communities. Malcolm X didn’t shade the truth because Malcolm understood that shading the truth did our communities no favor. Now fast forward 55 years and the violence that infects our black urban communities that Malcolm X foretold has come to past. Can it be related to the misunderstanding of our black history but those who have no compassion towards their brothers and sisters. Have we relegated a significant portion of our black youth to be labeled lower than dogs? The miseducation of our black youth must be corrected. We must get our black youth to comprehend and understand the honor of our black history. Malcolm X was more than a symbolic letter to be worn for the purpose of fashion. Malcolm X asked the black community to be all it can be but the journey begins with self education. So, do something really militant read a book about your history and wear that badge of honor.

Jan. 9, 2020

Two magnificent poets died on January 9, 68 years apart, one died on January 9, 1946, Countee Cullen was one of the driving forces of the Harlem Renaissance, the other great black poet Amira Baraka died on January 9, 2014, was one of the driving forces of the Black Arts Movement. Two exceptionally talented black men who spoke directly to the communities of blacks that supported them. I would like to celebrate the works of both artists as I read from some of their more popular creations on my blog today. Next, the black poet of Newark, New Jersey, Amira Baraka who agitation towards injustice forced our black communities to confront that injustice directly. Beyond Amira Baraka’s words was a passion for direct action.

JANUARY 9, 2014 on this day Amiri Baraka joined the ancestral literary giants of blackness. This afternoon I salute his greatness.

This Work Shook The Entire State Of New Jersey And The Nation in 2001. Amiri Baraka​ revealed his thoughts on the destruction of America in 2001, ​the ​destruction that was in his words 400 years in the making. So, if you aren’t looking for a pollyanna perspective of provoked ​thought. Go to my blog for this morning’s in his words, my voice, Amiri Baraka’s, Somebody Blew Up America. As I continue to journey on our black history need not be a black mystery.

Jan. 9, 2020

Two magnificent poets died on January 9, 68 years apart, one died on January 9, 1946, Countee Cullen was one of the driving forces of the Harlem Renaissance, the other great black poet Amira Baraka died on January 9, 2014, was one of the driving forces of the Black Arts Movement. Two exceptionally talented black men who spoke directly to the communities of blacks that supported them. I would like to celebrate the works of both artists as I read from some of their more popular creations on my blog today. First, the mercurial Countee Cullen who lifestyle caused him many problems in his 42 years of life.


The history of blacks includes many inspiring artists who laid claim to defined brilliance and excellence. One of these individuals was Countee Cullen, whose words created magic on the pages he decorated with incredible letters of profound truth. Quick question, who was the only man to marry a Dubois and teach a Baldwin? Why, Countee Cullen, who married the daughter of WEB DuBois, Yolande DuBois and taught High School French to James Baldwin.

This master ancestor was sometimes overlooked by two of his contemporaries Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston during the marvelous age of the Harlem Renaissance. However, ​his impact on the literary community during that period of time was quite legendary. , I intend to pay special homage to Mr. Cullen, who faced life’s challenges of racism and prejudice but still managed to excel and produce fantastic works of written art.

Mr. Cullen’s life was swirled in controversy but his poetic verses rose above those circumstances as his measured greatness were magnified by his creation of verse. As we move along day by day, remember this, our black history need not ever be a black mystery.