Sep. 3, 2019

Part One Celebrating The Life Of Charles Hamilton Houston My Words

In a Jim Crow segregated capital of the United States, Washington DC on September 3, 1895, a baby boy was born, Charles Hamilton Houston. His father was William Houston was the son of a former slave, was a practicing attorney while his mother Mary was a seamstress. Who would have known that this black baby boy would grow up to be the architect of the systemic plan that dismantled Jim Crow? Yes, 124 years ago today Charles Hamilton Houston was born. There will be no banners flying high in the sky celebrating the life of this magnificent black man. Well, there will probably be celebrations at the Howard University Law School where Dr. Houston plied his trade and built an army of young black attorneys that were fortified with his knowledge and expertise to take down all the vestiges of a horrendous system that kept black Americans tethered to a life of second-class citizenship and no inalienable rights in a nation forged supposedly by democratic principles of justice and freedom. Oh, there also will most likely be a celebration at the National Offices of the NAACP where Dr. Charles Hamilton Houston structured the legal foundations that swept this nation into acknowledging that it could not continue to oppress black Americans without impunity in local. state, and federal institutions. Dr. Houston set the plans in place to bring Jim Crow down to its knees. He established the methodology of action in meetings over the years with black leadership that attacked with ferocity those forces that were bent on keeping black Americans in a subservient position of power. So on this day when many of our black communities will go on with their daily activities without even thinking about the man who was responsible for the majority of educational, political, civil, social, and economic gains we enjoy today. I, The Blackman Who Reads Aloud will dive into the life of one, Charles Hamilton Houston, by reading an intellectual paper written by Florence Roisman from the Indiana University Law School. In addition, I will also read the final recorded words of Charles Hamilton Houston that directed towards his young son prior to his death in 1950. We, and I mean we in every sense of the word, every living and breathing American owes a debt of gratitude to this incredible warrior of justice. Just look around as you travel today on journeys in this nation and you will see the impact of Charles Hamilton Houston, Esquire. I know it's easy to marvel at the accomplishments of Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Thurgood Marshall, Roy Wilkens, Ella Baker, Dorothy Height, Mary Bethune, James Farmer, Whitney Young, and Adam Clayton Powell among others but in reality, the man standing behind those all those black leaders in relative obscurity with immense power and determination was Charles Hamilton Houston. We should all honor his name today.