Speaking & Teaching

Mar. 21, 2020

On these days where we are seemingly stuck in motion on endless revolving escalator of sameness. When it is society locking down social connections and with it social consciousness. It is important to be encouraged by black excellence of our talented black wordsmiths.So why not read 12 poems by 12 poets written by 12 brilliant black poets some living some dead that provide a range of black thoughts and black black life experiences. Experiences that range from a poet’s perspective of revolt on the Amistad, a game of spades, a poet’s sense of America’s injustice, a poet’s visit to Chicago Black Belt pool hall, to a poet cataloging black daily life, and on and on. We will live through the wordsmiths verses past and present. The Black Blogger believes that education comes in many forms today that form is poetry.

Mar. 21, 2020

I may create some anger but what the hell. I am as Fannie Lou Hamer said sick and tired of being sick and tired of this negative depiction of black men in white entertainment productions. The most recent case is Madam C.W. Walker’s Self Made. I just finished watching the Netflix series on Madame CJ Walker and I was highly disappointed. Why? Because in order to again disrespect black men this movie created a scene between Booker T. Washington and Madame Walker that never existed where Washington supposedly told Walker that he had no interest in supporting her business. It was a vile attempt to display Washington’s as a villain to Black women? Why? The only thing I can see is that it was done again to show black men in a bad light. I saw over and over Blair Underwood’s character being shown in a negative light as a woman chasing drunk who was bent in the end of the movie on the Walker empire. I can tell when a movie is produced by black women looking for ratings rather than truth. I really wanted to like this movie but I simply couldn’t. Tell what was Tiffany Haddish’s role in the movie other than adding name recognition? Hell even her husband had his balls cut off not by white men but by black women in the movie. Aren’t we sick and tired of this destructive process that is constantly being displayed by white controlled companies to trash black male hood? We should be. It’s not 1960. Dammit it’s 2020 and we will never be unified with trash like these shows encouraging disunion and deceit. Hell, they even put Dubois in the movie to blast Washington. Another thing the Graphic Survey article on the New Negro was published in 1926 not 1910. So where did idea of the New Negro appear in 1910 Harlem. You play around with our truths you get burned by conscious black folks and trick unconscious, unknowing folks. Way too many historical mistakes in this series. It is pure fiction that’s all. PERIOD!

Mar. 21, 2020

W.E.B Du Bois, a founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) through most of his life was a staunch integrationist.  In 1934 however he advanced the argument that since integration would not happen in the nation any time soon, African Americans had to take steps to develop their own economic and political resources independent of white help and support.  Du Bois gave this speech on June 26, 1934 as he resigned from the NAACP. This morning’s Project Uplift Literacy, In Their Words My Voice again revisits the words of W.E.B. DuBois one of the greatest intellectual freedom warriors that this nation ever produced no matter his/her color or creed.

So, after being solely an integrationist for his entire life DuBois finally came to the conclusion that America would never allow any for race equality of any sort in this country. Twenty years later the Supreme Court ruled that separate but equal was unconstitutional in the historic Brown decision. Still 86 years later the nation is operating as two America’s one economically fluid the other economically desolate. There still is a racial inequity between whites and blacks. 86 years after this speech an unequal Nation within a prosperous Nation is defined by color, education and wealth. Now, this country has been shaken by an unseen colorblind enemy that has its eyes on both races. Those two country’s within this one country may have to unite to defend and ensure their survival.

Mar. 20, 2020

Today on our planet entire nation states are closed by the tiniest of viruses unseen by the naked eye. That virus so tiny yet powerful enough to stop nations with thermonuclear power capable of destroying the 50 times over is match match for the power of the unknown. While we may shelter in place today. Today’s unknown is that virus and my thought: your arms are simply to short to box with the omnipotent one. Bow down to his power and respect his planet or he will deliver onto you a force so mighty yet so small. It will bring you to your knees world leaders. So listen, and listen well to this mighty poem that describes that creation that some of us have abused for greed and profit. Yes, world understand this your arms are too short to box with God.

Most Black Americans know that James Weldon Johnson ​was the songwriter and poet who along with his brother, John Rosamond Johnson, created the Black National Anthem, Lift E'vry Voice and Song. The poem was created while Johnson was residing in his hometown of Jacksonville, Florida. His talent with prose was exceptional but James Weldon Johnson also had a unique ability to organize and build. It was those skills that endeared James Weldon Johnson to black history.

Many black people know the song but don't know the creator of that epic song, Lift E'vry Voice and Sing. They also don’t know this pertinent fact, the very first Black Executive Secretary of the NAACP was James Weldon Johnson. Johnson was personally recruited to work at the NAACP by WEB Dubois. Dubois taught Mr. Johnson while he was a professor at Atlanta University. James Weldon Johnson was a magnificent creator and wordsmith who easily could have been very successful in his private life by simply doing what he did best create magic with words and music.

Yet, Mr. Johnson’s call to greatness would not end with his creative energies to produce impressive poems and songs. You see James Weldon Johnson sought something bigger, something more impactful, he sought the total citizenship rights of people of color in the United States. He was a true patriot and believed that the words written in this country’s Constitution applied to all men and women no matter their creed or color. In 1916 James Weldon Johnson joined the NAACP as a Field Secretary at the behest of WEB Dubois. Eventually, he was asked to become the first Black Executive Secretary of this fledgling organization in 1920. James Weldon Johnson had an enormous amount of inner personal desire, with that source of power James Weldon Johnson took on the mission of building the NAACP.

It was to become under his leadership the ultimate voice for black civil, judicial, and social rights in this nation. Under Johnson's stewardship, the NAACP scoured the nation uncovering acts of violence being perpetrated on blacks. Johnson placed an emphasis on stamping out the lynchings and white mob violence that afflicted our black ancestors. I could write so much more about James Weldon Johnson, more than I could put on any page or post. So, I decided this morning read one of his greatest creation on In His Words, My Voice, The Creation, as I pay homage to this great ancestor of mine. He lived a full life of 67 years but still, he left before he could see full citizenship rights applied to black citizens in this country. We are still struggling for those rights. We are now concentrating on the economic, educational and judicial rights of equality in this country. Until we secure those rights, James Weldon Johnson spirit cannot rest while millions of people are still seeking equality.

Mar. 19, 2020

It’s been almost 57 years since Medgar Evers was murdered in the driveway of his home. The hot Bullet that sheared through Medgar Evers body silenced Medgar Evers voice but not his ideals for reaching the goal of an humane society. Many men and women led the fight for civil rights in this nation. However, there was only one Medgar Evers, who sought and fought so relentless for the freedom of black Mississippians during an era when any black man fighting for human and social rights in that vile state festering with hatred and violence was sacrificing life and limb on a daily basis. Medgar Evers love a state that hated every drop of blood that ran through his black body. The majority of whites, from the White Citizen Councils to the Ku Klux Klan plotted almost daily on ways to silence his voice before it gained substantial national power. Each and every time Medgar Evers left his home, or NAACP office, or church, or meeting room, Medgar Evers was leaving with a target on his chest. Medgar Evers knew this but yet he continued to go out days, nights, weekends to press for black justice, black citizenship and voting rights for every black Mississippian.

Three weeks before Medgar Evers was murdered in the driveway of his home in Jackson, Mississippi on June 12, 1963. Medgar Evers gave this speech which spoke about his hope and love that he had for the state of his birth Mississippi. Why did he love a state that despised him so? Medgar Evers could've packed his bags and taken Myrlie and his children north, west or even east during the time of his ascension in the NAACP. Medgar Evers could've chosen to be a national figure traveling the highways and byways of this country far from the hatred infection that sickened Mississippi. However, Medgar Evers was a tried and true Mississippian who wanted the best for all Mississippians white and black. So, in this speech, he gave the reasons why Mississippi was his home. He also delivered reasons why he would never leave the Magnolia State. Byron De La Beckwith killed the man on that June night but he never ever could kill the spirit that embodied that proud black man of immense courage.

While Medgar Evers name may not be as well known as Malcolm or Martin, it isn't because of Medgar Evers being any less important to the cause of our civil rights. You see Medgar Evers worked in a state that forced blacks into a state of silence. Mississippi didn't want Medgar Evers to have a voice of influence so the white power brokers did everything possible to ensure his messages were kept to the smallest circle possible. However, no matter how hard they may have tried the message that Medgar Evers delivered was being heard. It would be further heard by Fannie Lou Hamer and the leaders of the Mississippi Democratic Party. It would be heard by those valiant and brave marchers in 1966 when the march from Memphis to Jackson was completed. It would be heard when Martin Luther King spoke from the Capitol steps in Jackson. It would be heard when Stokley Carmichael spoke of Black Power in Greenwood, Mississippi. Yes, you could silence the body of Medgar Evers but never the courageous spirit that energized him.

The Blackman Who Reads Aloud will read the words of Medgar Evers love for a state that despised him. The question we should all ask today is why doesn't all of America still not love the spirit of Medgar Evers?​

Uploaded on Nov 27, 2018